Dr. Fager
Horse of the Year 1968
A Time To Remember

 

 Contact Steve Williams  for information and availability of
 a 'video time capsule' on this great horse.

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The Californian  --  May 18,1968   
Dr. Fager in the winner's circle after his only western start 
carrying 130 pounds. Jockey Brulio Baeza up 

Audio
(click for audio  -  short download - 1 mb)
   

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Dr. Fager, 22 starts, 18 wins. Earned $1,002,642. Horse of the Year in 1968. Sire of 29 SW's, including Dr. Patches, L'Alezane, Arachnoid. 

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Aug. 24, 1968: 
Carrying 134 pounds, Dr. Fager set the then-world record for a mile in the Washington Park Handicap at Arlington Park. 
The time for his 10-length victory was 1:32 1/5. 
The previous record was 1:32 3/5, set by three-year-old Buckpasser on
 June 25, 1966 at Arlington Park.

My sincere thanks to 
the California Thoroughbred Breeders Association 
for permission to use this article (August 1979) that those new to the sport of racing
 may also  re-live the moment.

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Back in the 1920's, the Riedlinger  brothers had a gold mine in a mare named Oreen. The daughter of Omus presented them with nine winners from nine foals, two of stakes class. Probably the least of her offspring was Draymont. This 1925 colt was sired by Wildair, the 1920 Metropolitan winner who had spent much of his career hidden in the shadow of Man o' War.
Unfortunately, Draymont was nothing like his sire, nor did he resemble his stakes-winning half-brothers on the track. In fact, the most incredible thing about his career is the fact that he managed to break his maiden  --  which he did as a two-year-old at Fairmont Park. Following this triumph Draymont never won again, although his career spanned the next five seasons. The son of Wildair could not have been sound since he averaged just four starts a year. Whether it was pain or simply a lack of interest that kept him from running will forever remain a mystery, but by the age of six he evidently felt he had seen enough of the track when he began to refuse at the barrier. The Reidingers were loath to put him in for a tag but were finally forced to at Caliente in 1931. The drop in class made not a whit of difference to Draymont, who continued his plodding ways right up until his retirement.
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For some reason he was given a chance in the stud and he made the most of it. One of his 16 foals (from 9 crops) turned out to be the stakes-winning filly Tilly Kate. She, in turn, produced an even classier runner in Tilly Rose. Through her daughter Aspidistra, Tilly Rose became the second dam of the great Dr. Fager and two-time sprint champion Ta Wee. Thus, unlikely as it may seem, the disinterested, easygoing Draymont turns up in the pedigrees of two of the fiercest competitors of recent years. Dr. Fager died in 1976 and the last of his foals reached the races this year (1979). They look to be a good group, for among them is Open Gate, impressive winner of the Junior League Stakes at Hollywood Park on May 30, 1979.
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